Leading by Example: Stacey Wakelin

Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much. – Helen Keller

STACEY WAKELIN (Founder From Passion to Purpose Events)

Stacey’s life changed direction in the fall of 2014. Motivated by the speakers at a Seattle event, and inspired by their courage, Stacey realized the time had come for her to move in the direction of her dreams. Her passion is, and has always been, to help people – and sidetracked by life, as many of us are – she still didn’t have the degree in social work she assumed was essential to making a difference.

But, with examples from the 2014 conference fresh in her mind, Stacey decided to create her own path! Take a look at what she’s accomplished without that degree – using her available resources, her skills and talents, and with the support of her family and friends:

  • Compassion 604: The Compassion Collective, a loosely organized group of co-workers and friends who get together semi-regularly to help people experiencing homelessness.
  • Creativity Counts, a series of crafting workshops, primarily for refugees, through the Literacy through Arts & Crafts program at Options Community Services.
  • BC Families for Inclusivity, a group whose “core belief is that every human being, without exception, deserves to feel safe, accepted and appreciated” and to that end voice their support for, and promote the inclusion of “LGBTQ youth and community members who face intolerance or discrimination.”

Bridges out of Poverty

A few months ago, Stacey attended a Bridges out of Poverty workshop, which provides insights into, and strategies aimed at reducing poverty. She came away from the experience feeling it was really important that more people in the community have an opportunity to attend one of these day-long workshops. On Tuesday, June 12, in Langley, Stacey Wakelin and the AYAM Civic Society will host a Bridges out of Poverty workshop led by Gayle Montgomery and Kim Godin.

For people who work or volunteer in the not-for-profit sector, social services, education, etc., this day-long workshop is for you! For more info, to attend, or to sponsor the seminar, please click here.

~ Debbie MacLeod

Action Looks Like This

This year, my #onelittleword is going to be ACTION. I’m hoping for new challenges, opportunities, adventures, and change-making. – Stacey Wakelin, January 8, 2018

Stacey Wakelin
Stacey Wakelin

In January, I wrote about New Year’s resolutions and procrastination, and how, for so many of us, those two words go hand-in-glove, which means, then, that we never really move beyond the wish-stage of a resolution. Of course, on the other side of that, are people like Stacey, who declare their intentions i.e. ACTION (see above), banish procrastination from their vocabularies, and set the stage to make a change.

For almost 4 years, I’ve devoted much of my spare time to creating opportunities to give back to my community. Now, it’s time to serve in a new way. Public service carries with it a huge responsibility. It’s a challenge that I respect, and my sole motivation, as it has always been, is to strengthen this community. – Stacey Wakelin

Stacey has followed her heart with commitment, with honesty and integrity, and with joy. In retrospect, her journey since 2014, could not have led her to any other place than where she is right now. Yesterday, on May 1, 2018, she announced her candidacy for the Township of Langley Council. Now, how exciting is that!

Stacey invites any woman who may be considering an election run in their future to step up as a volunteer and join her journey. – Media Release

~ Debbie MacLeod

#OneLittleWord – ACTION

Never allow anyone to convince you being a dreamer is a liability. – Stacey Wakelin, Founder – From Passion to Purpose Events

Dreaming

This year, my #onelittleword is going to be ACTION. I’m hoping for new challenges, opportunities, adventures, and change-making. Last year, someone said, “Stacey, you’re the dreamer and I’m the practical one” – the word dreamer, spoken like it was a liability. I walked away and found myself wondering—when did having a dream become a bad thing?

That conversation motivated me to organize this event, The CREATIVE CHANGE-MAKING Conference, and I hope you can join us. The world needs more dreamers connected to their purpose in life!

~ Stacey Wakelin, Founder


The CREATIVE CHANGE-MAKING Conference has been organized to showcase local heroes, individuals from within our own communities, who are creating their own path, leading by example, and following their dreams through purposeful work.

Intrigued? Come listen to the stories. Ask questions. Be inspired to change your life!

Speaking of Impermanent…

A flashmob recreates Rembrandt’s painting, The Night Watch, in a shopping centre in Breda to mark the painting’s return to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

Companies and organizations use flash mobs, and pop-up events as marketing tools. Both, by definition, are temporary, and both are seemingly random or unplanned although, in reality, nothing is left to chance. Pop-up events can expand brand awareness, attract a new audience, or even characterize an entire organization.

Compassion Pop-up signageFor example, Compassion 604: The Compassion Collective is a loosely organized group of co-workers and friends who get together semi-regularly to help people experiencing homelessness. Initiated by Stacey Wakelin, Compassion 604 uses a Facebook group to communicate, organize, and solicit donations of needed items. With virtually no overhead, Stacey, and her group of neighbours-helping-neighbours operate with few out-of-pocket expenses.

Compassion Pop-up donationsFrom random-acts-of-kindness to an oatmeal street breakfast, to a pop-up hair salon, with free clothing, food, and a card-making table, Compassion 604 members use their imagination, their connections, and their initiative to plan each event. This means no two Compassion Pop-ups will ever look the same. To date, one event used empty retail space, another, a community centre, and still others went directly to the streets. All items are donated by individuals, and local businesses; monetary donations are used to purchase items to give away.

The Compassion Collective shows us what can be accomplished by a group of people, passionate about making a difference, who think outside the box, and use the resources at hand.

Sometimes a worn and weathered old saying is still a perfect summation: Where there’s a will, there’s a way.

~ Debbie MacLeod


The CREATIVE CHANGE-MAKING Conference has been organized to showcase local heroes, individuals from within our own communities, who are creating their own path, leading by example, and following their dreams through purposeful work.

Intrigued? Come listen to the stories. Ask questions. Be inspired to change your life!

Stacey’s Pink Elephant

You have to risk a little crazy if you ever hope to escape the gravitational pull of the ordinary – David Usher, Let the Elephants Run: Unlock Your Creativity and Change Everything

I first heard of David Usher in September 2013 when I attended Edmonton’s E-Town Festival of ideas. Most of you will know Usher as a musician, the front man for the rock group Moist, but he’s also a self-professed Geek, a businessman, the creative director of a non-profit, and a popular keynote speaker. In 2015 he published a book based upon his conference presentations about creativity and the creative process. Let the Elephants Run: Unlock Your Creativity and Change Everything is just as inspiring as he is.

Let the Elephants Run by David Usher

I accidentally came across Let the Elephants Run at the library a few weeks ago, and snatched it up. Usher’s premise is that creativity is 5% inspiration, and 95% hard work. He believes we’re all born with the creative gene, but it often becomes buried within us over time. By defining his creative process, he gives everyone a template by which they can rediscover their own creativity – and put it back to use. (Read more about the book here.)

So, what is a Pink Elephant, and why does Stacey Wakelin have one?

In Usher’s book, Pink Elephant refers to those “crazy ideas that come from big dreams and a wide imagination,” that “often seem impossible and not grounded in reality.” Stacey’s Pink Elephant is that she wants to help people, specifically those experiencing homelessness. And, not simply through a donation, or volunteering with a non-profit. Stacey wants tiny house villages for the homeless in the Fraser Valley, similar to those in U.S. locations, and exactly like this group is trying to get off the ground in Abbotsford.

Compassion Pop UpAs she takes time to educate herself on the issues involved, Stacey and a pretty amazing group of volunteers have been organizing Compassion Pop Up Events in various Langley/Lower Mainland communities via The Compassion Collective. Each of these events gives The Collective the opportunity to meet individuals experiencing homelessness, and to speak with them first hand. Event details involve research, and sometimes coordination with other groups, businesses, and organizations, which offers up more chances for Stacey to learn as much as she can about it all.

A Pink Elephant? Absolutely.

A crazy idea? Maybe, to some, but not so much if you’re taking it one step at a time.

~ Debbie MacLeod


The CREATIVE CHANGE-MAKING Conference has been organized to showcase local heroes, individuals from within our own communities, who are creating their own path, leading by example, and following their dreams through purposeful work.

Intrigued? Come listen to the stories. Ask questions. Be inspired to change your life!